Medical Accuracy Advisories

Medical Accuracy
Authored by: Kate Hendricks, MD, MPH&TM; Date: 2005 September 10
Revised by: Patricia Thickstun, PhD; Date: 2007 October 10
Last Reviewed: 2013 April 03

The terms “medical accuracy” and “medically accurate” have been the subject of much discussion in legislative and scientific circles. This advisory discusses what medical accuracy is and how it applies to pregnancy and STI prevention recommendations for sex education?

Hendricks K, Thickstun P. Medical accuracy. Medical Institute Advisory. Austin, TX: Medical Institute for Sexual Health; 2007 Oct 10. Report No.: MISH/Advisory/2005-0910 +Revised 2007-1010. 2 p.

Oral Sex and Risk Reduction Associated with Barrier Methods: Condoms, Dental Dams, and Plastic Wrap
Authored by: Patricia Thickstun, PhD; Date: 2005 September 29
Revised by: Patricia Thickstun, PhD; Date: 2007 December 26
Last Reviewed: 2013 April 03

According to a 2005 report by the National Center for Health Statistics, slightly more than half of both male and female American teens aged 15 to 19 years have engaged in oral sex. This proportion increases with age to about 70% of all 18- and 19-year-olds, a figure which is considerably higher for those who have also engaged in vaginal intercourse. While many teens consider oral sex to be much �safer� than vaginal sex, this is a dangerous misconception. This advisory discusses oral sex and risk reduction.

Thickstun P. Oral sex and risk reduction associated with barrier methods: condoms, dental dams, and plastic wrap. Medical Institute Advisory. Austin, TX: Medical Institute for Sexual Health; 2007 Oct 10. Report No.: MISH/Advisory/2005-0929 +Revised 2007-1226. 2 p.

STD and STI: What is the Difference?
Authored by: Kate Hendricks, MD, MPH&TM; Date: 2004 October
Revised by: Patricia Thickstun, PhD; Date: 2007 October 10
Last Reviewed: 2013 April 03

Although the terms “sexually transmitted disease (STD)” and “sexually transmitted infection (STI)” are often used interchangeably, they are by no means identical. STI is by far the more inclusive term. STI is an important and scientifically valid term because dangerous pathogenic organisms can be present without causing disease. This advisory discusses the distinction between STD and STI.

Hendricks K., Thickstun P. STD and STI: What is the difference?. Medical Institute Advisory. Austin, TX: Medical Institute for Sexual Health; 2007 Oct 10. Report No.: MISH/Advisory/2004-10 +Revised 2007-1010.

Sexually Transmitted Infections: Reported vs Estimated
Authored by: Anjum Khurshid, MBBS, MPAff; Date: 2006 September
Revised by: Patricia Thickstun, PhD; Date: 2007 October 10
Last Reviewed: 2013 April 03

The number of sexually transmitted infection (STI) cases is expressed in different ways by different sources. Sometimes STI cases are referred to as “reported” and other times as “estimated.” This advisory discusses what the difference is between the number of “reported” and the number of “estimated” STI cases.

Khurshid A, Thickstun P. Sexually transmitted infections: Reported vs estimated. Medical Institute Advisory. Austin, TX: Medical Institute for Sexual Health; 2007 Oct 10. Report No.: MISH/Advisory/2006-09 +Revised 2007-1010. 3 p.